Stories and Reviews

Who won the (very competitive) Arts in Society grants? Here’s the list

About 265 artists and organizations applied and 21 will get cash

Molly Bounds and the aesthetics of imperfection

There’s an interesting sort of honesty here, where true stories of real people are highly abstracted to their most basic representation.

Cut & paste: Collage Club looks forward; Stacey Steers back

Surrealism rears its dreamy head at Alto Gallery and Robischon Gallery.

Stacey Steers takes it to the “Edge” at Robischon

Methodically working a sensibility that is dark and dreamy, bygone and contemporary, Steers finds herself in the midst of a particularly busy spell.

This is the kind of show museum directors get fired over

The exhibit’s centerpiece, Dáreece Walker’s in-your-face drawings, impart a bold heroism on those who strike back at law enforcement.

Will Photography Survive Its Art-Historical Karma?

What photography did to painting oh-so-many years ago, it’s now suffering itself next to the infinite scrollability of the internet

Review: Tya Anthony/Jess Dugan, updating identity, defining place

Race, gender and identity have preoccupied artists working with photography since the 1980s, and it is fascinating to see those inquiries continue today

Dmitri Obergfell: The Death of Cool

This is the first of a series of experimental writings about, and in collaboration with, select Denver artists.

Is this Denver’s biggest piece of art?

Forrest Morrison’s murals at the Curtis Hotel are irreverent, irresistible and spectacularly excessive at every turn. Or on every floor, you might say.

Mexico City and Material Art Fair: The Importance of Being There

One of the best things that happened from the 2015 Biennial of the Americas was the funding for the exchange of artists between Mexico...

Tales of the down, and not-quite-out, at the VFW

Rupert Jenkins reviews "Down in Denver," photos by Jody Akers and Billy “ghost lenz” Riesling


At CVA: Beyond the news bubble, a personal kind of Mid East politics

Center for Visual Arts photo exhibit is a welcome opportunity to grasp the complexities not so much of the Middle East, but of what it means to be Middle Eastern.

At RedLine, losing ground in the culture war

RedLine Denver presents a flock of wise owls when what we really need is a herd of pissed-off elephants.

Review: Looking in, out and back at Arvada photo show

Review: “Double Exposure” plus “Stop/Look/See” at the Arvada Center by Rupert Jenkins

After 20 years of trying, Christo cancels Colorado river project

Christo keeps his decision to cancel the controversial "Over the River" project brief. He is simply done. Here is the official statement: “After pursuing Over The...

At MOA, plugging in, tuning out, turning up story of 94-year-old Dorothy Tanner

“I’m a long story,” Dorothy Tanner says of herself. And she tells it, in bits and pieces, not parsing the good from the bad,...

Western art, but without the romance

The show is all about expressing the sensibilities of Old West iconography through the techniques of contemporary art.

Review: Terry Maker has an issue with pills. A big one.

Art exhibits can be as much about where they take place as they are about the objects they put out there. A show about...

Is fruit really that sexy?: Loving the art, loathing the artist statement

      I have been asked to write statements for my art exhibitions for over forty years, and they keep getting shorter and shorter, which exasperates...

Review: Shockwave, Japanese Fashion Design, 1980s-90s

A review of Shockwave: Japanese Fashion Design, 1980s-90s, curated by Florence Müller, at the Denver Art Museum